Authentic Wisconsin.  Snowdrop - Galanthus nivalis


Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 15, 2012.

Above: Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna (3/15/12).


Common Snowdrop - Galanthus nivalis (Early spring bloomer)

A true harbinger of spring, Snowdrops are a member of the Amaryllis family and comprise a small genus (Galanthus) with about 20 species.

The Snowdrop comes by its name honestly because of its white flowers and its ability to push through the snow. That's why in Europe they are sometimes referred to as snow piercers.

The Galanthus name means "milk flower" and nivalis means "of the snow."

Alfred Lord Tennyson referred to the Snowdrop as the "Solitary firstling". (see poem on sidebar)

It is a garden escapee and has naturalized in parts of eastern North America including parts of Wisconsin.

Snowdrops typically bloom in March into early April in Wisconsin.

Snowdrops in UW Arboretum at edge of Longenecker Gardens in Madison, Wisconsin on March 26, 2019.

Snowdrops in UW Arboretum at edge of Longenecker Gardens in Madison, Wisconsin on March 26, 2019.

Above: Snowdrops in UW Arboretum at edge of Longenecker Gardens in Madison, Wisconsin on March 26, 2019.



The Snowflake Fairy
by Scottish author, Elizabeth Gordon

Robed in white comes Snowflake Fairy, braving wintry winds and ice, pearly "Maid of February," whom the glistening frosts entice.

Gladly welcome Snowflake Fairy, on your terrace give her room. She alone in February braves the cold to shed her bloom.



For more information on Snowdrop, visit Wikipedia.

Or, visit the UW-Madison Wisconsin Master Gardener website page on Snowdrops.


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Wisconsin Wildflowers


Common Snowdrop
Galanthus nivalis


Flower meaning: Consolation or hope


Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 15, 2020.

Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 15, 2020.


Above: Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna (3/15/20)


Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 30, 2020.

Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 30, 2020.

Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 30, 2020.

Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 30, 2020.

Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on March 30, 2020.


Above: Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna (3/30/20)


Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna on May 20, 2019.


Above: Snowdrops in woods between the Sycamore Tree on Arbor Drive and the bike path entrance to the Oak Savanna. (4/01/19)




Above: A wonderful video from our neighbors just south of us at the Chicago Botanic Garden.


Snowdropspiercing snow cover in Europe.


Above: Galanthus nivalis piercing snow cover in Europe (March 2004).


Snowdrops in the snow.

Snowdrops piercing snow cover.

Snowdrops piercing snow cover.

Snowdrop.

Snowdrop by Elizabeth Gordon with illustration by  M. T. (Penny) Ross.

The Snowdrop
by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Many, many welcomes,
February fair-maid,
Ever as of old time,
Solitary firstling,
Coming in the cold time,
Prophet of the gay time,
Prophet of the May time,
Prophet of the roses,
Many, many welcomes,
February fair-maid!
Alfred Lord Tennyson


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